42nd Infantry Division (United States)

42nd Infantry Division
42nd Infantry Division SSI.svg
42nd Infantry Division shoulder sleeve insignia
Active1917–1919
1943–1945
1947–present
Country United States
Branch United States Army
TypeInfantry
SizeDivision
Garrison/HQGlenmore Road Armory, Troy, NY
Nickname(s)"Rainbow" (special designation)[1]
Motto(s)Never Forget!
Engagements

World War I

World War II

War on Terror

Commanders
Current
commander
MG Steven Ferrari
Notable
commanders
Maj. Gen. W. A. Mann
Maj. Gen. Charles T. Menoher
Maj. Gen. Charles D. Rhodes
Brig. Gen. Douglas MacArthur
Maj. Gen. C. A. F. Flagler
Maj. Gen. George W. Read
Maj. Gen. Harry J. Collins
Maj. Gen. Martin H. Foery
Maj. Gen. Joseph J. Taluto
Insignia
Distinctive unit insignia42d ID DUI.jpg

The 42nd Infantry Division (42ID) ("Rainbow"[1]) is a division of the United States Army National Guard. The 42nd Infantry Division has served in World War I, World War II and the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT). The division is currently headquartered at the Glenmore Road Armory in Troy, New York.

The division headquarters is a unit of the New York Army National Guard. The division currently includes Army National Guard units from fourteen different states, including Connecticut, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, and Vermont. As of 2007, 67 percent of 42ID soldiers are located in New York and New Jersey.[2]

Rainbow Division

The 42ID came to be known as the "Rainbow Division". When the United States declared war on Germany in 1917, it federalized National Guard divisions to quickly build up an Army. In addition, Douglas MacArthur, then a major, suggested to William A. Mann, the head of the Militia Bureau, that he form another division from the non-divisional units of several states. Secretary of War Newton D. Baker approved the proposal, and recalled Douglas MacArthur saying that such an organization would "stretch over the whole country like a rainbow."[3] The division was created using units from 26 states and the District of Columbia. The name stuck, and MacArthur was promoted to colonel as the division chief of staff.[4]