2019 Hong Kong anti-extradition bill protests

2019 Hong Kong anti-extradition bill protests
2019 Hong Kong antiELAB June 9 and 16.png
Hundreds of thousands of protesters marching in white and black on 9 June (up) and 16 June (down) respectively, captured in Admiralty.
Date28 April 2019 – ongoing
(1 month, 2 weeks and 5 days)
Location
Hong Kong:
  • Wan Chai to Admiralty (31 March 2019)
  • Causeway Bay to Admiralty (28 April 2019)
  • Central to Admiralty (6 June 2019)
  • Causeway Bay to Admiralty (9 June 2019)
  • Admiralty (12 June 2019)
  • Central (14 June 2019)
  • Admiralty (15 June 2019)
  • Causeway Bay to Admiralty (16 June 2019)
Dozens of other cities abroad (date varies)
Caused by
Goals
  • Withdrawal of the bill
  • Prevent extradition to mainland China
  • Resignation of Chief executive Carrie Lam
  • Release and drop charges against protesters, and retract the characterisation of the protest as "rioting" (since 12 June)
MethodsOccupations, sit-ins, civil disobedience, mobile street protests, internet activism, mass strike
StatusOngoing
Concessions
given
  • Political dissident & student activist Joshua Wong to be released from prison on Monday
  • Carrie Lam announces suspension of the bill
Parties to the civil conflict
Casualties
Death(s)1[3] (suicide, 15 June)
Injuries72[2] (as of 12 June 2019)
Arrested30[4][5] (as of 14 June 2019)

The 2019 Hong Kong anti-extradition bill protests are a series of demonstrations in Hong Kong and other cities around the world, demanding the withdrawal of the Fugitive Offenders and Mutual Legal Assistance in Criminal Matters Legislation (Amendment) Bill 2019 proposed by the Government of Hong Kong. It is feared that the bill would cause the city to open up to mainland Chinese law and that people from Hong Kong could become subject to a different legal system.

Various protests have been launched in Hong Kong by the general public and legal communities. Among these, the 9 June protest organised by the Civil Human Rights Front (CHRF), which the organisation estimates was attended by 1.03 million people, has gained wide mass media coverage.[6] Protests in other places were also staged by overseas Hongkongers and locals. The protests are the largest protests in Hong Kong since the Umbrella Movement in 2014.

Despite the widespread demonstrations, the government insists on the bill's passage, stating that the bill is urgent and that the legal "loophole" should be fixed.[7] The second reading was originally scheduled on 12 June but was not held due to protests,[8] and a scheduled meeting on the next day, 13 June, was also postponed.[9]

On 15 June 2019, the bill was indefinitely delayed by Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam.[10] However, she also made it clear in her remarks that the bill was simply being delayed, not withdrawn.[11] This led to a protest suicide at Pacific Place a few hours later.[12] Another mass protest, urging the government to withdraw the bill and for Carrie Lam to step down as Chief Executive started from Victoria Park on 16 June 2019.[13][14]

The organizers of the 16 June 2019 protest claim nearly two million people joined the protest. If the claims are accurate, it would be the largest protest in Hong Kong's history.

Background

The Fugitive Offenders and Mutual Legal Assistance in Criminal Matters Legislation (Amendment) Bill 2019 (Chinese: 2019年逃犯及刑事事宜相互法律協助法例(修訂)條例草案) is a proposed bill regarding Cap. 525) so that arrangements for mutual legal assistance can be made between Hong Kong and any place outside Hong Kong.[15] The bill was proposed by the Hong Kong government in February 2019 to request the surrender of a Hong Kong suspect in a homicide case in Taiwan. The government proposed to establish a mechanism for transfers of fugitives not only for Taiwan, but also for Mainland China and Macau, which are not covered under the existing laws.[16]

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