1404 Ajax

1404 Ajax
Discovery [1]
Discovered byK. Reinmuth
Discovery siteHeidelberg Obs.
Discovery date17 August 1936
Designations
MPC designation(1404) Ajax
Pronunciations/ · AY-jaks
Named after
Ajax (Greek mythology)[2]
1936 QW
Jupiter trojan[1][3][4]
Greek[5][6] · background[6]
Orbital characteristics[3]
Epoch 23 March 2018 (JD 2458200.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc81.76 yr (29,864 d)
Aphelion5.9044 AU
Perihelion4.6992 AU
5.3018 AU
Eccentricity0.1137
12.21 yr (4,459 d)
247.16°
0° 4m 50.52s / day
Inclination18.005°
332.92°
59.772°
Jupiter MOID0.0433 AU
TJupiter2.8890
Physical characteristics
Mean diameter
81.43 km (derived)[4]
81.69±3.2 km[7]
83.99±1.28 km[8]
96.34±2.25 km[9]
28.4 h[10]
29.38±0.01 h[11]
34 h[12]
0.048±0.009[8]
0.050±0.003[9]
0.0508 (derived)[4]
0.0665±0.005[7]
C (assumed)[4]
V–I = 0.960±0.032[4]
9.00[7][9]
9.3[1][3][4][8]
9.87±0.47[13]

1404 Ajax (s/ AY-jaks), provisional designation 1936 QW, is a carbonaceous Jupiter trojan from the Greek camp, approximately 83 kilometers (52 miles) kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 17 August 1936, by German astronomer Karl Reinmuth at Heidelberg Observatory in southern Germany, and named after the legendary warrior Ajax from Greek mythology.[1] The assumed C-type asteroid belongs to the 40 largest Jupiter trojans and has a longer than average rotation period of 29.4 hours.[4]

Orbit and classification

Ajax is a C-type asteroid, that orbits in the leading Greek camp at Jupiter's L4 Lagrangian point, 60° ahead of its orbit (see Trojans in astronomy). It is also a non-family asteroid in the Jovian background population.[6][14] Jupiter trojans are thought to have been captured into their orbits during or shortly after the early stages of the formation of the Solar System. More than 4,500 Jupiter trojans in the Greek camp and 7,000 in total have been discovered.[5]

It orbits the Sun at a distance of 4.7–5.9 AU once every 12 years and 3 months (4,459 days; semi-major axis of 5.3 AU). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.11 and an inclination of 18° with respect to the ecliptic.[3] The body's observation arc begins at Heidelberg 6 days after its official discovery observations in August 1936.[1]

Other Languages
العربية: آياس 1404
Bân-lâm-gú: 1404 Ajax
català: (1404) Ajax
Deutsch: (1404) Ajax
Ελληνικά: 1404 Αίας
español: (1404) Ajax
Esperanto: 1404 Ajakso
euskara: 1404 Ajax
français: (1404) Ajax
Հայերեն: (1404) Այաքս
Bahasa Indonesia: 1404 Ajax
italiano: 1404 Ajax
Latina: 1404 Ajax
magyar: 1404 Ajax
Baso Minangkabau: 1404 Ajax
norsk: 1404 Ajax
norsk nynorsk: 1404 Ajax
occitan: (1404) Ajax
polski: (1404) Ajax
português: 1404 Ajax
русский: (1404) Аякс
slovenčina: 1404 Ajax
српски / srpski: 1404 Ајакс
suomi: 1404 Ajax
svenska: 1404 Ajax
Tagalog: 1404 Ajax